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Important Dates  

Time:
1:30 PM–3:00 PM Monday Sep 24, 2018
Speaker:

Lucas Anderson, CITL

Location:

Armory building, room 428

Description:

Most teachers get evaluated by their students at the end of the course by implementing ICES.  But by then, it is too late to make changes that will make a difference for your current students.  You should check in with your students before it is too late.  Come to this workshop to learn how to design, implement, and interpret Informal Early Feedback (IEF) to improve the class experience for everyone.

Don't forget:  conducting IEF is an important requirement of the Graduate Teacher Certificate!

 

This workshop counts towards the Graduate Teacher Certificate or the Certificate in Foundations of Teaching.

Cost: Free, but registration required
Sponsor:

Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning

Event Source: CITL Calendar

Time:
All Day
Location:

iHotel and Conference Center

Description:

THWARTS provides an opportunity for early-career researches and graduate students on severe storm meteorology, wind science and engineering, and structural engineering disciplines and anyone working/interested on better understanding of near-surface tornado wind hazards and impacts.

Website: Link
Sponsor:

Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Event Source: CITL Calendar

Time:
11:30 AM–1:00 PM Wednesday Sep 26, 2018
Speaker:

Cheelan Bo-Linn (CITL)

Location:

Room 428 Armory Buildling (Southwest corner of the building)

Description:

Junior Faculty Seminar Series on Teaching & Learning

Come join this learning community by participating in this specially designed seminar series for junior faculty, though all are welcomed to participate. We'll share strategies and best practices for effective and efficient teaching. There will be great conversations, handouts, and lunch! Since each session builds on each other, we hope you will be able to attend all the meetings.  

 

Session 2:  Active Learning Strategies for Student Engagement & Deep Learning

 

Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018
11:30 – 1:00
Room 428, Armory Building 
 

Learning is not a spectator sport (Chickering & Gamson). Students must be cognitively, physically, and affectively engaged for deeper learning and retention to occur. Yet, we have to admit, there are many distractions and the attention span of our students can be relatively short. How do we manage the amount of content that we should teach while providing opportunities for our students to be engaged in active learning?

 

We’ll explore and practice several active learning strategies, beginning with those that can be easily implemented and are of low risk. Also, we’ll learn about Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATS), active learning strategies that are ungraded and provide important information about how well our students are learning. 

 

This workshop counts towards the Graduate Teacher Certificate, the Teacher Scholar Certificate or the Certificate in Foundations of Teaching.

Please mark these sessions on your calendar
11:30 – 1:00 
Room 428, Armory Building

Wed, Sept. 19, 2018   Session 1: “I wish I had known that earlier: Using Informal (IEF) and Formal (ICES) Student Feedback to Improve Teaching and Learning

Wed, Sept. 26, 2018  Session 2: Active Learning Strategies for Student Engagement & Deep Learning

Wed, Oct. 3, 2018     Session 3: Effective Questioning Skills 

Wed, Oct. 10, 2018   Session 4: Critical Factors for Motivating Students to Learn

Wed, Oct. 17, 2018    Session 5:  Creating Effective Team Projects and Student Teams

Wed, Oct. 31, 2018    Session 6: Teaching What You Don’t Know 

 

Cost: No cost for joining the faculty learning community.
Sponsor:

Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning (CITL)

Event Source: CITL Calendar

Time:
5:30 PM–6:45 PM Wednesday Sep 26, 2018
Speaker:

Anita Greenfield, John Kotnarowski

Location:

Room 428 Armory Buildling (Southwest corner of the building)

Description:

Workshop Series: Preparing to Take the EPI

 

These four workshops are designed for Graduate Students who plan to take the EPI. The workshops are free, but registration is required. Space is limited, so register early at http://go.illinois.edu/EPI_Workshop_Registration. First-time test-takers and students re-taking the EPI are eligible to attend. Each workshop will focus on a different part of the EPI, including the EPI's structure, how it's scored, preparation tips, definition of terms, responding to open-ended questions, strategies for effective interviewing, and activities and resources you can use on your own to prepare for the EPI. During each session, you'll also have time to practice what you've learned and receive brief feedback. Detailed information about the EPI can be found at http://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/measurement-evaluation/english-proficiency-interview.

 

Questions? Email us at citl-epi-info@illinois.edu.

 

Location: Room 428, Armory Building  (Southwest corner of the Armory Building).

 

Workshop session descriptions:

 

Session 3: Wednesday, September 26, 5:30 to 6:45pm. Learn strategies for answering open-ended questions.

 

Session 4: Tuesday, October 2, 5:30 to 6:45pm. With other workhops participants, practice completing sample EPIs; set goals for oral English improvement; learn about resources you can use to improve your English skills. Note: This session will be most beneficial if you also attend one or more of the earlier sessions. The content in session 4 pulls together everything learned in sessions 1, 2, and 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost: No cost for joining the workshop.
Sponsor:

Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning (CITL) and ESL/ITA Program

Event Source: CITL Calendar

Time:
All Day
Location: Reimagining the Classroom Symposium
Description:

One-day symposium explores the current and future state of the university classroom. 2018 theme "Classrooms Without Borders" looks at relationships between classroom design, teaching pedagogy, and emerging technology. Keynote speakers, roundtable discussions, faculty vignettes, vendor sponsors, and information about new classroom projects on this campus. Lunch included. Free to faculty and staff.

Website: Link
Sponsor:

Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning

Event Source: CITL Calendar

i>clicker

i>clicker is a physical remote student response system (with an optional mobile app component called REEF Polling by i>clicker) with which an instructor is able to poll students in a variety of ways to help engage students and enhance learning.

Download

Karle Flanagan-Using i>clickers in Large Lecture Classes

 

 

Engage Students in the Classroom. i>clicker was originally designed as a tool to help engage students in large enrollment courses, but is being used increasingly in smaller 30-50 person courses.Students are vested in answering the questions posed and seeing how their votes compare with rest of class. Since humans are typically only able to maintain attention for periods up to 20 minutes at a time, i>clicker is a great tool to reset up to 20 minutes at a time, i>clicker is a great tool to reset student attention, when used at different points of the lecture. Julia Shapland, Accountancy, uses i>clicker in her 600-700 student intro course to better engage with students which would otherwise be nearly impossible to do with such a large course.

Encourage all Students to Participate.  Instead of getting limited responses for what I call the “front five” students (the few students that always raise their hands), you are getting feedback from all students in the classroom. This really helps student participation in large enrollment courses.

Immediately Assess Students' Mastery of Content.  i>clicker is a quick and easy way to gauge student’s comprehension of pre-existing knowledge to help determine what you need cover in class and what you don’t. It’s also a great way to measure the mastery of content that you’ve gone over in class or in the reading. 

Improve Student Learning Using Peer Instruction. One of the more impactful ways of utilizing i>clicker in class is using it for peer instruction, typically using the Think, Pair, Share model. Students are asked to answer a question individually (Think). If the results are mixed and warrant more discussion, students are asked to pair up with a neighbor or two (Pair) and discuss the topic in small groups. The instructor visits the groups, providing some clarifying hints to lead the group toward the best answer. Finally, the students vote a second time and share their thoughts on the topics (Share).

Solicit Honest Student Feedback with Anonymous Polling. Lena Hann, Kinesiology and Community Health, teaches a Human Sexuality course of around 300 students each semester. She relies on anonymous polling for students to share their personal experiences with the class. Students report that the process is very valuable and they often see that the process is very valuable and they often see that they are not alone in their experiences.

Mark Smith-Creating Class Time with i>clickers